Articles

The maize (Zea mays) b-32 protein shows RIP activity in yeast cells


Abstract


Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are either single-chain (type 1) or two-chain (type 2) toxins. They are toxic to eukaryotic cells by cleaving a N-glycosidic bond in an extremely conserved loop located in the 28S RNA. This releases a specific adenine and inactivates the ribosome, ultimately inhibiting protein synthesis. Plant RIPs have been intensely investigated because of their projected antiviral, antifungal and insecticidal activity. RIPs also have biomedical applications as the toxic mojety of immunotoxins. Given their biotechnological potentials, it is strategic to develop platforms to rapidly evaluate the activity of recombinant RIPs. This investigation fills this need in that it reports that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system to assess the impact of genetic manipulations on the functionality of a recombinant Zea mays RIP named b-32.

Keywords

The maize (Zea mays) b-32 protein shows RIP activity in yeast cells

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Maydica - A journal devoted to maize and allied species

ISSN: 2279-8013